Using VandR mapping techniques for platform development

I attended the first Jisc Digital Leaders course a couple of years ago (you should go, if you get the opportunity), and one of the central ideas is that of Visitor and Residence (VandR) in digital practice.

VandR is a really useful way of thinking about people’s interactions/behaviours/relationships with technology. You can read more about it on Dave White’s website. I think it is fair to say that VandR was a counter against the prevalent (and potentially dangerous) use of Prensky’s Digital Immigrant/Native work.
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My computer told me to say this…

Lots of people are going on about how AI change how we do assessment and feedback. Or, how AI can replace teachers. Or how AI can provide truly personalised learning opportunities.

But what if it is the wrong way round?

Instead of AI replacing the education system, maybe it should be the product of it?

Three years of a degree, and during that time, students have to develop AI so their tutors don’t know whether assessments are self- or computer-generated. If they can fool their tutor, then they pass.

Submit two version of each assignment, when the AI gets a higher mark, you graduate!

No-one is talking about that, are they?

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Pigeon
Pigeon

Or for our new robot overlords:

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Which reminds me of:

Learning Analytics: what’s in a name?

Peter Morville 'Analytics' - FlickrIn 1991, the Dream Warriors released My Definition of a Boombastic Jazz Style. This post is ‘my definition’, my definition of Learning Analytics.

I first became interested in Learning Analytics (LAs) in 2013/14 when I was working on a student data project (http://wmed.co.uk) that I had entered in a couple of competitions (ed-invent and Jisc’s Summer of Student Innovation).
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Adobe Slate

Adobe Slate

slate.adobe.com

iOS app

What is it?

Adobe Slate is an online service that allows you to create your own presentation/website hybrids. You can use it to build narratives within your teaching, or for assessment. The image takes centre stage, so while it suits the Arts, there are many applications across the whole University.

You can easily add text, images and links to create attractive objects. The Slates live on Adobe’s websites, so you can easily share links via email, Twitter and Facebook. With a little tinkering, you can also embed the Slate directly into Blackboard or WordPress (everything you need is here).
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